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In Wake of Presumptive Positive Coronavirus Case in Spotsylvania, Spanberger to Hold Coronavirus-Focused Telephone Town Hall on Friday

The Congresswoman Will Be Joined in the Interactive Event by Officials from Mary Washington Healthcare, the Virginia Department of Health, & the University of Virginia

Washington, March 10, 2020

WASHINGTON, D.C. — U.S. Representative Abigail Spanberger will host a telephone town hall on Friday, March 13 with local officials and healthcare experts to discuss preparations and suggested precautions related to the ongoing COVID-19 (coronavirus) outbreak.

Yesterday, the Virginia Department of Health announced a presumptive positive case of the coronavirus disease found in a patient from Spotsylvania County. During Spanberger’s telephone town hall on Friday, she will deliver a brief update on efforts in Congress to address the coronavirus, take constituent questions regarding the outbreak, and hear from local experts about guidance and recommendations for Central Virginia seniors and families.

“The growing coronavirus outbreak in the United States has the potential for significant disruptions to our economy, our national security, and the health and safety of Central Virginia families. Central Virginians should not panic, but we need to be prepared for a continued spread of the disease and take necessary precautions to mitigate its effects,” said Spanberger. “On Friday, I’ll be joined by local healthcare officials and medical experts to learn more about how we can best be prepared. This event will also be an opportunity for Central Virginians to ask questions about specific steps they can take in their own lives to stay healthy and safe as the coronavirus spreads to additional Virginia communities. I look forward to having many Central Virginians join our conversation, and I’m closely following breaking developments related to the coronavirus in our Commonwealth.”

WHO:

U.S. Rep. Abigail Spanberger

Dr. Christopher Newman — Chief Medical Officer and Operating Officer, Mary Washington Healthcare

Dr. Denise Bonds —  District Health Director, Thomas Jefferson Health District for the Virginia Department of Health

Dr. Peter Kasson — Associate Professor of Molecular Physiology and of Biomedical Engineering, University of Virginia

Dr. William Petri — Professor of Medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases and International Health and Vice Chair of the Department of Medicine, University of Virginia

WHEN: 6:00pm-7:00pm ET, Friday, March 13

To join the interactive telephone town hall, constituents should dial-in to 855-920-0555. And to listen live to the conversation, Central Virginians can go to https://spanberger.house.gov/live during the event.

Previously, Spanberger had planned to host an in-person town hall in Spotsylvania on Friday. However, due to ongoing concerns about the coronavirus and with new positive cases identified in the Commonwealth, the event has been modified into a telephone town hall out of caution.

BACKGROUND

Last week, Spanberger voted with a bipartisan majority of the U.S. House to pass a coronavirus preparedness and response supplemental package. And earlier that week, Spanberger and a bipartisan group of her colleagues met with Vice President Pence and White House Coronavirus Response Coordinator Deborah Birx at the White House to discuss the administration’s response to the coronavirus outbreak in the United States.

CDC GUIDANCE

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) provides the following guidance for Americans who want to help prevent the spread of the coronavirus:

  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.
  • Stay home when you are sick.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipe.
  • Follow CDC’s recommendations for using a facemask.
  • CDC does not recommend that people who are well wear a facemask to protect themselves from respiratory diseases, including COVID-19. Facemasks should be used by people who show symptoms of COVID-19 to help prevent the spread of the disease to others.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after going to the bathroom; before eating; and after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing.
  • If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol. Always wash hands with soap and water if hands are visibly dirty.

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